This post’s purpose is to provide Maple Learning browsers with additional resources for continuing education. All the sites are grouped according to category and given a small blurb. Here is a list of the resources.

Language Resources:

Duolingo.com

Duolingo provides easy tools to make language learning fun. They have apps for all three major smartphone OS’s that teach language through a series of games. This site is great if you find language tedious. Duolingo is a free resource to use.

Rosetta Stone.ca

Rosetta Stone offers lessons for thirty different languages. They also offer mobile apps on Android, IOS, Kindle, and Nook. Rosetta Stone offers a free demo of their services, but after that, you either pay a subscription fee or buy outright. Can be extremely pricey.

Babbel.com

Babbel.com throws you into the language learning right away. When loaded onto a computer it asks you what language you’re trying to learn, your age and a few questions in that language in order to determine your competency. They also have an iPhone app, but you’ll pay for that one.


Math Resources:

Math.com

Math.com offers homework help from kindergarten to grade 12. When clicking on any of the lessons you’re redirected to a parent site IXL Learning which also offers Language Arts. There are plenty of sample problems for students to try, clicking on Grade 5 has 207 practice skills alone. Also provides Apps for Ipad, Android, and Kindle.

Khanacademy.org

Khan Academy offers math learning in a wide variety of math related subjects, from Grade 1-8 to college along with adding more complex skills. They also provide skills in Science, Arts and Humanities, Computing, and test prep. Also, it comes with an iPhone app.

Alison.com

Alison.com is a free learning resource for more advanced math. It also offers resources to help with grade school math, but those are hosted by IXL again. When starting a module on Alison.com all you need to do is sign up with a social media account, and you can learn in over 750-course subjects. I personally like this site.

Computing Resources:

Codecademy.com

Codecademy offers interactive coding practice, articles, and lessons in coding. You can start for free by signing up with a Google account or a Facebook account. When starting a new lesson it tells you an estimated amount of time to complete the course, and the proficiency you should have before starting the course.

Code.org

Code.org is a resource centered on educators teaching students how to code. Tutorials are broken down into age groups and deceive needed. Not all tutorials are in things like HTML5; there are even game design courses on this website.

Codeschool.com

Code school offers in-browser coding tools, along with video tutorials and tracking tools to help you progress on your journey. The free version offers ten courses and the first level of the 40 paid courses. At 29 dollars a month, you get access to all the courses offered with only a month to month subscription service.

General Resources:

iTunes U

For anyone with a Mac or IOS device, iTunes U is a fantastic learning tool. It offers directly from university courses in a huge variety of subjects. From Creative writing to Modern Physics there are courses in anything you could want to learn. Each course is structured differently, however, and additional resources may need to be purchased.

Youtube.com

Everybody has heard of YouTube, but the world’s number 1 video player is also an excellent educational tool. Video tutorials on every subject convincible and entire channels dedicated to learning. According to Mashable.com, these top ten channels are the best for browsing. Veritasium, Vsauce, C.G.P. Gray, MinutePhysiscs, Smarter Every Day, Scishow, Crash Course, Numberphile, Asap Science, Bad Astronomy. Buyer beware, however, Youtube videos are not consistent in their quality.

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